Final Taste of Summer: Sugar-Free Mango Puddings with Mango and Vanilla Bean Drizzle

Prep time 20 mins | Cooking time 45 mins | makes 6 and a bit puddings

MangoPuddings_Nicholasrider_BrendonTheSmilingChef_9
Photo: Nicholas Rider
You don’t have to say goodbye to the delicious fruity flavours of summer with these delicious puddings. Adapted from a recipe by James Reeson.

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A couple of days ago we pulled the first two mangoes of our tree. We have been growing them in a halved wine barrel in the backyard for at least two and a bit years now. It was such a special family occasion to slice open the cheeks and scoop spoonfuls of the pudding-like golden flesh.

Mangoes are most definitely the taste of summer. They happen to be one of my favourite fruits too. Maybe this is due to fond memories of tasting syrupy Alphonso Mangoes in Mumbai a few years ago. Getting to savour this special variety, which is best eaten fresh throughout Asia, was a real treat.

For years we have used tinned alphonso mango pulp in desserts like mum’s mango mousse. It’s the best because you can enjoy it at any time of year. Their rich concentrated sweetness is perfect paired in creamy desserts and spongey puddings.

Ingredients:

Puddings

  • 2 tbsp butter, softened
  • 4 eggs
  • 300g self-raising flour
  • 150mL rice malt syrup
  • ¼ tsp bi-carb soda
  • 850g can unsweetened alphonso mango pulp (see note)

Mango Drizzle

  • 2 tbsp rice malt syrup
  • 1 vanilla bean, split and seeds scraped

To Serve

  • Greek yoghurt, double cream or vanilla ice cream

Method:

Prepare the tins. Grease a 6-hole mini bundt tin or muffin pan with butter. You may end up with excess batter depending on the size of your tin so it’s a good idea to grease a few extra ramekins. Pre-heat oven to 180ºC fan forced.

Make the puddings. Combine the eggs, self-raising flour, rice malt syrup, bi-carb and 400g mango pulp in a blender until smooth. Reserve the remaining pulp for the drizzle. Use spoons to divide the batter among the prepared tin, filling up the ramekins with any excess batter.

Bake the puddings. Grab a roasting tray that’s big enough to hold the mini bundt tin, with a rim at least 3cm high. Place the bundt tin into the roasting tray and fill up with enough boiling water to reach halfway up the sides of the bundt tin. Repeat with another tray for the excess ramekins. Bake in the pre-heated oven for 40-45 minutes or until a wooden skewer inserted into the thickest part of the pudding comes out clean.

Make the drizzle. While the puddings cook, place the rice malt syrup, vanilla pod and seeds and ¼ cup cold water into a small saucepan. Bring to the boil and simmer for 2-3 minutes. Turn off the heat and allow the syrup to steep for 5 minutes before adding the remaining mango pulp.

Serve the puddings warm with yoghurt or ice cream and drizzle the syrup over. Alternatively the puddings taste great served cold.

Unsweetened alphonso mango pulp can be found at most Indian, Sri-Lankan and some Asian grocers. I usually purchase the Aditi or Mother’s Recipe brands.

I love receiving photos of your kitchen creations. Send me your recipes and dishes by tagging #brendonthesmilingchef on Instagram or Tweeting to @bthesmilingchef. Let me know what you’re making today by leaving a message in the comments section below, or send me a message via my social networks.

Happy Cooking and Keep Smiling,

Brendon 🙂

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7 Comments Add yours

  1. chefceaser says:

    Reblogged this on Chef Ceaser.

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  2. That looks amazing! Great recipe!

    Like

    1. Thanks so much for your kind words Marisa. I really enjoyed writing this piece. Unfortunately summer has drawn to a close in Oz but I love that these tasty puds can be made any time of year 😉 Happy cooking

      Like

  3. Ema Jones says:

    It seems you are very fond of desserts like me!

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    1. Thanks for getting in touch Emma. I definitely am a horrible sweet tooth but I am always looking for ways to cut out sugar and replace it with lower GI alternatives. Stay tuned for plenty more exciting desserts and sweet bakes which can be made using low GI sweetners.

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  4. This recipe looks delicious! This is definitely on my list to try soon. Thanks so much for sharing.

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    1. Thanks very much for the lovely comment Forks and Passports. You are most welcome. There is definitely plenty more where this came frpm so feel free to chec back in the next few days 😉 I’d love to see your photos if you try it. Tag #brendonthesmilnghchef. Happy cooking and keep smiling

      Liked by 1 person

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